Artist Spotlight: Dan Ferguson
Artist Spotlight: Dan Ferguson more>>

A selection of paintings by London-born, Belfast-based artist . Ferguson worked as a high school art teacher for 14 years before pursuing his MFA and starting to develop his own body of work. His current focus is depicting scenes of people and places that move him in some way. Whether whimsical or dark, beautiful or challenging, Ferguson’s aim is to honour the spirit of his subjects as much as the accuracy of the moment itself. As he states further: “I have explored memory and social/physical perception, and how we all affect each other with our experiences and stories, and observations. They can be spoken or visual. These memories can be mine, or belong to others, and they seem to be channelled into a colour scheme that tries to displace the conventional ‘sepia’ of nostalgia, and instead evoke a spectrum exploding timelessness. I try to be honest and tender with the memories and scenarios I create, but instead of words I try to achieve this with a mix of both powerful and subtle colour and forms.” Check out more of Ferguson’s work below!                                         Share Tags

“Orange Sky” by Artist Scott Sueme
“Orange Sky” by Artist Scott Sueme more>>

A series of gorgeous new paintings by Vancouver artist , who has spent time reflecting on what it means to make work with everything going on in the world. “Free from old routines, a sense of play emerged that was inspired by everyday objects and revisited places. What was once ordinary revealed its inner spirit, giving way to new consideration of colour and form. In a year where all expectations were cast aside, these compositions provided a place for curiosity and optimism.” When you look at each composition you can’t help but feel like everything is in its right place. See more from below! Scott Sueme – Planting Seeds 40×60 (2020) Scott Sueme – Holding Hopeful Emptiness 30×24 (2020) Scott Sueme – Stack 30×24 (2020) Scott Sueme – Forage 30×24 (2020) Scott Sueme – Mesh 20×16 (2020) Scott Sueme – Hedge Clippings 40×60 (2020) Scott Sueme – Libra Moon 48×40 (2020) Scott Sueme – We Broke Open The Gemstone On The Patio 48×40 (2020) “Orange Sky” paintings available for purchase . Share Tags

Artist Spotlight: Barry Yusufu
Artist Spotlight: Barry Yusufu more>>

A selection of mixed media paintings (charcoal and acrylic) by , a self-taught visual artist from Nasarawa state, Nigeria. Love the beautiful subtle tones in the faces combined with the large areas of flat colour. In addition to charcoal and paint he also utilizes coffee and papier mache in his work. He describes his art as Kolo art, meaning “madness in a sane way” and is the leader of an art movement called “The Kolony”, a brotherhood of young contemporary Nigerian artists.             Share Tags

Artist Spotlight: Alex Garant
Artist Spotlight: Alex Garant more>>

A selection of recent work by Toronto-based artist (previously featured ). A pioneer of Contemporary Figurative Op Art, Garant’s oil paintings combine graphic qualities with traditional portrait techniques. Patterns, duplication, symmetry, and image superposition are key elements of her imagery as are themes of self-definition and the duality between our inner selves and outer personas. As Garant states further: “Creating during the pandemic has been more challenging than usual, like all creative beings, navigating the ups and downs of this new reality was sometimes an emotional battle. My most recent pieces are inspired by self-reflection and specifically the role of self-inflicted appearances. Our constructed nature fighting with our instinctive core often results in the persona we end up presenting to outsiders. While some obvious elements featured in my work is riding the line between kitsch and whimsy, the expression of the characters can be perceived as melancholic and naive, longing for love and acceptance.” Check out more images below!                                             Share Tags

Artist Spotlight: Alina-Ondine Slimovschi
Artist Spotlight: Alina-Ondine Slimovschi more>>

A selection of new work by Timişoara, Romania-based artist, . Although there is still a certain vulnerability present in the imagery, these paintings definitely mark a significant aesthetic shift for Slimovschi. See more of her work below. Share Tags

Rugs by Macarena Luzi
Rugs by Macarena Luzi more>>

is a self taught textile designer based in Los Angeles, California, producing colourful rugs and often collaborating with other artists to bring their designs to life. Collaboration with Collaboration with Share Tags

Illustrator Spotlight: Lydia Ortiz
Illustrator Spotlight: Lydia Ortiz more>>

A selection of work by illustrator and designer . Born in Tondo Manila, Philippines, she describes her childhood as being “filled with loud grandmas, animals, Filipino folklore, stories of ghosts, and regular visits to the witch doctor”. She migrated to the United States when she was 19, spent a few years in New York, and now lives in San Francisco. Her clients include: The New York Times, The Washington Post, Instagram, Chronicle Books, Bitch Mag, Teen Vogue, California Academy of Sciences and more. Share Tags

An Intricate Lace Mural Envelops the Facade of a French Fashion Museum
An Intricate Lace Mural Envelops the Facade of a Fre... more>>

 Art #lace #murals #public art An Intricate Lace Mural Envelops the Facade of a French Fashion Museum September 29, 2020 Grace Ebert All images © Nespoon On France’s northern shores lies the port city of Calais, a municipality that once was a destination for lace manufacturers. To escape economic and social difficulties, English textile artists and engineers immigrated in the late 19th Century, often establishing clandestine operations that defied patent laws by bringing specialty machines and practices to the region. Soon after, Calais became an industrial hub for lace manufacturing, employing around 40,000 residents. A new mural by Warsaw-based artist Nespoon (previously) celebrates that rich history through an oversized textile that envelops the facade of a factory. The public artwork features delicate mesh and floral elements that cover the side of the Cité de la Dentelle et de la Mode, the city’s fashion and lace museum. Nespoon chose this particular motif, which dates back to 1894, from the institution’s archive before spray painting its intricate details onto the building. Check out the video below to see the lace motif in-progress, and find more of the artist’s textile-based pieces on Behance and Instagram.     View this post on Instagram   A post shared by NeSpoon (@nes.poon) on Sep 20, 2020 at 6:22am PDT #lace #murals #public art   Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member and support independent arts publishing. Join a community of like-minded readers who are passionate about contemporary art, help support our interview series, gain access to partner discounts, and much more. Join now!   Share this story   Tweet Pin It Also on Colossal Related posts on Colossal about lace murals public art Traditional Lace Patterns Spray-Painted onto Museums, Residences, and Walls by NeSpoon New Lace Street Art Created with Ceramic, Textile, and Spray Paint by NeSpoon Urban Jewelry: New Lace Street Art by NeSpoon Urban Jewelry: Lace Street Art by NeSpoon Figural Lace Sculptures Attached to Found Wood by Agnes Herczeg This article comes from the Internet:An Intricate Lace Mural Envelops the Facade of a French Fashion Museum

Affected by a Central Force, Dancers Perform Implausible Bends on a Perpetually Spinning Stage
Affected by a Central Force, Dancers Perform Implaus... more>>

 Art Dance #performance art #video Affected by a Central Force, Dancers Perform Implausible Bends on a Perpetually Spinning Stage September 29, 2020 Grace Ebert  “Celui qui tombe,” or he who falls, is an illusory performance from self-described circus artist Yoann Bourgeois (previously) that opens with six dancers on a spinning platform. As the central stage turns, the performers run forward to fight the perpetual motion, even though their efforts keep them in the same spot. The sextet moves easily throughout the performance, grasping onto each other and stopping in neat lines as they respond to the stage’s revolutions. As Kottke notes, the centripetal force of the platform makes it possible for the dancers to contort their bodies into seemingly implausible positions, like the acute bends shown below, and remain standing. Bourgeois created “Celui qui tombe” in 2014 and shares an extensive collection of similar illusions on YouTube. You also can keep up with his work on Instagram.     #performance art #video   Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member and support independent arts publishing. Join a community of like-minded readers who are passionate about contemporary art, help support our interview series, gain access to partner discounts, and much more. Join now!   Share this story   Tweet Pin It Also on Colossal Related posts on Colossal about performance art video Dancers Demonstrate the Perpetual ‘Mechanics of History’ in a Performance by Yoann Bourgeois Neon-Clad Ballet Dancers Take the Streets of Hong Kong by Storm in Celebration of Their 40th Year A Trio of Dancers Brave Icelandic Temperatures in a Stunning New Music Video for Pianist Hania Rani Shape-Shifting Figure by Frank Force Wins Best Illusion of 2019 Pixel: A Mesmerizing Dance Performance Incorporating Interactive Digital Projection This article comes from the Internet:Affected by a Central Force, Dancers Perform Implausible Bends on a Perpetually Spinning Stage

Chrome Faces Protrude from Drippy, Graffiti Backdrops in Hyperrealistic Paintings by Artist Kip Omolade
Chrome Faces Protrude from Drippy, Graffiti Backdrop... more>>

 Art #chrome #hyperrealism #masks #painting #portraits Chrome Faces Protrude from Drippy, Graffiti Backdrops in Hyperrealistic Paintings by Artist Kip Omolade September 28, 2020 Grace Ebert “Luxury Graffiti Kace I,” oil, spray paint and acrylic on canvas, 36 x 48 inches. All images © Kip Omolade, shared with permission Set on a graffitied backdrop, the chrome masks Kip Omolade (previously) paints appear to emerge from the canvas, jutting out from the vibrant display to confront the viewer. The Harlem-born artist layers dripping colors and typographic markings that contrast the smooth, gleaming faces protruding from the center for his new series Masks: Portraits of Times Square and Luxury Graffiti, which he completed in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. In a statement, he explains the history of the collection: In New York City during the ’80s, my tag was ‘Kace’ and I would ‘get up’ on MTA subway car interiors, public walls in Brooklyn, and graffiti black books. Throughout the ’90s, I never stopped tagging. Even when I was painting from life, I was still tagging here and there in random spaces. Years later, I produced a real-life ‘Kace’—when my twin sons were born, I named them Kent and Kace. The ‘Kace’ tags in these paintings reference NYC subway ‘bombing’ of the ’80s, but mostly it’s about legacy. I want my work to represent our shared experiences of the past, present, and future. Omolade’s process includes sculpting a resin mold of a chosen subject, which he then covers with chrome and uses as a reference for his hyperrealistic portraits. Many of the masks are reflective, revealing a hidden landscape. In Omolade’s self-portrait (shown below), an American flag in the shape of a bullseye marks his forehead, a nod to racial injustices in the United States. To see more of Omolade’s works, check out his virtual solo show at Jonathan LeVine Projects through October 4 and head to his Instagram.   “Luxury Graffiti Self-Portrait (COVID-19),” oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches “Luxury Graffiti Kent I,” oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches “Luxury Graffiti Kent I,” oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches “American Love,” oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches “Red Stare,” oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches  #chrome #hyperrealism #masks #painting #portraits   Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member and support independent arts publishing. Join a community of like-minded readers who are passionate about contemporary art, help support our interview series, gain access to partner discounts, and much more. Join now!   Share this story   Tweet Pin It Also on Colossal Related posts on Colossal about chrome hyperrealism masks painting portraits Chrome Face Masks and Hyperrealistic Oil Portraits by Kip Omolade Hyperrealistic Oil Paintings of Vivid Chrome Masks by Kip Omolade Animal-Human Hybrids Spotted on New York Subway in Surreal Paintings by Matthew Grabelsky Hyperrealistic Portraits by Artist Arinze Stanley Reflect the Emotions of Black Experiences Evoking West-African Masks, Faces Emerge from Cast-Iron Skillets by Artist Hugh Hayden This article comes from the Internet:Chrome Faces Protrude from Drippy, Graffiti Backdrops in Hyperrealistic Paintings by Artist Kip Omolade

The fifth EnvironmentalProtection Art Creation Contest
The fifth EnvironmentalProtection Art Creation Contest more>>

The fifth international environmental protection public welfare design competition is an international public welfare Design Competition sponsored by the state government of North Carolina, undertaken by the art exchange society of America and supported by the public welfare fund project of North Carolina. At present, the fifth competition is held in the United States, New Zealand, and China (including Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan), covering millions of designers and environmentalists. In China’s competition area, phoenix.com, Sohu News and other media and website platforms in China and the United States reported the grand event of the competition simultaneously. The theme of the competition is distinct and the concept of environmental protection design is advocated. The competition unit involves visual communication design, industrial product design, environmental art design, and emphasizes new creative methods such as material reorganization and environmental protection. This year, the award ceremony was cancelled due to the epidemic situation.   Organizer Organizers: state government of North Carolina, American Art Exchange Association Official website: www.aaca.cc New Zealand Division:www.aaca.uz China Division:www.cnpop.art Competition theme The competition is a free theme, and only three design units are open for the competition 1. Visual communication design (including graphic design) [ Packaging design ] UI Design Logo design Mascot design Album design Poster design H5 design Animation and video [ Industrial product design (including product design) ] [ Environmental art design (including Landscape Architecture Design) ] Award setting The competition is divided into five stages of awards, including silver (10%), bronze (15%) and excellence (20%) according to the number of participants and the quality of the work, the number is not fixed. [global finals] Gold Award  2 winners, award $8000, trophy. Silver Award  2 winners, award $6000, trophy. Bronze Award 4 winners, award $4000, trophy.   [US division] Gold Award, 2 winners,$2000, trophies and qualification for the global finals Silver Award, 6% winners, Bronze Award, 10% winners Entry rules 1. Please send your work to match@aaca.cc 2. Please download the registration form, click here to download. Time node End Submission on January 5, 2021 The winners will be announced on February 15, 2021 World finals on March 10, 2021 Global finals announced on March 25, 2021( www.aaca.cc Query) Entry fee A uniform charge of $120 for a piece of work Contact information Please email query@aaca.cc  or  + 1 – (919) 733-4636

Colorful, Geometric Stitches Embolden Black-and-White Photographs of Historical Figures and Cultural Icons
Colorful, Geometric Stitches Embolden Black-and-Whit... more>>

 Art Craft Photography #celebrities #embroidery #found photographs #portraits Colorful, Geometric Stitches Embolden Black-and-White Photographs of Historical Figures and Cultural Icons September 24, 2020 Grace Ebert Yayoi Kusama. All images © Victoria Villasana, shared with permission When Victoria Villasana (previously) lays a long stitch on a vintage photograph, she’s connecting the pattern or geometric shape to a piece of history, culture, or philosophy. The Mexican artist transforms found black-and-white images of cultural icons and historical figures through vibrant embroideries. Turquoise fibers radiate from Nelson Mandela’s fist, a gold, chevron collar lines Chadwick Boseman’s shirt, and Yayoi Kusma sports a multicolor garment with varying dots and stripes. Emboldened by stitches that often breach the photograph’s edges, the multi-media artworks exude power, strength, and beauty. Villasana sources many of the images from the public domain, although she sometimes collaborates with photographers, as well. “I think color helps us to connect emotionally and I like to look at the past and merge tradition and vanguard. I’m also interested in symbolism and geometry in art as a way to communicate deeper meanings with each other,” she shares with Colossal. To explore more of Villasana’s geometric additions, head to Instagram, and see the originals and prints available in her shop.   Chadwick Boseman. Photography by Marcus Smith Federica Violi Kara Walker. Photograph by Ari Marcopoulus Nelson Mandela Left: Miles Davis. Right: Harriet Tubman Ryu Gwansun Yayoi Kusama #celebrities #embroidery #found photographs #portraits   Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member and support independent arts publishing. Join a community of like-minded readers who are passionate about contemporary art, help support our interview series, gain access to partner discounts, and much more. Join now!   Share this story   Tweet Pin It Also on Colossal Related posts on Colossal about celebrities embroidery found photographs portraits Colorfully Embroidered Vintage Photos of Artists and Cultural Icons by Victoria Villasana Precise Angular Stitches Encase Found Twigs in Natalie Ciccoricco’s New Embroideries Hand-Stitched Flowers and Landscapes Revitalize Found Photographs by Artist Han Cao Striking Portraits by Artist Tawny Chatmon Embellished with Gold Garments and Ornate Backdrops Found Photographs Embroidered With Colorful Thread by Julie Cockburn This article comes from the Internet:Colorful, Geometric Stitches Embolden Black-and-White Photographs of Historical Figures and Cultural Icons

Revealing Struggles and Joy, Expressive Portraits Are Superimposed onto Watercolor Foliage
Revealing Struggles and Joy, Expressive Portraits Ar... more>>

 Art #flowers #plants #portraits #watercolor Revealing Struggles and Joy, Expressive Portraits Are Superimposed onto Watercolor Foliage September 24, 2020 Grace Ebert “Being true to your nature III.” All images © Àngela Maria Sierra, shared with permission Spanish artist Àngela Maria Sierra, who works as Riso Chan, explores the human psyche through subtly layered foliage. “I always imagine that they are someone’s soul, what we don’t see, our nature,” Sierra says of the delicate botanical assemblages that she overlays onto her subjects’ faces and torsos. Each portrait begins with a focus on texture and pattern as the artist paints clusters of twigs and leaves with watercolor. She then scans those botanical elements and uses Procreate to superimpose the figure onto the original piece. Alongside their simple beauty, the pastel paintings, some of which are self-portraits, reflect the narratives and worries that consume the artist’s daily life. She describes her work as “a journal where I express moments or feelings that are important for me during those days. It’s a way to give those feelings space and then let them go.” Tied to both struggles and joys, topics include finding freedom through creativity during lockdown, growing up in an drug-filled home, and the bravery required to move forward. Based in Amsterdam, Sierra is the founder of Bloom Art House, which hosts creative workshops throughout the capital city. Keep up with her expressive artworks on Instagram.   “Freedom” “Being true to your nature II” “Spring” Left: “Turning on the lights inside.” Right: “Being true to your nature I” “New Path” “Toxic home” #flowers #plants #portraits #watercolor   Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member and support independent arts publishing. Join a community of like-minded readers who are passionate about contemporary art, help support our interview series, gain access to partner discounts, and much more. Join now!   Share this story   Tweet Pin It Also on Colossal Related posts on Colossal about flowers plants portraits watercolor Gestural Brush Strokes and Focused Color Palettes Form Watercolor Portraits by Nick Runge Elegant Blooms Float Amid Botanical Watercolor Paintings by Artist Denise Ramsay Lifelike Eyes Clustered Together in Striking Abstract Portraits by Emilio Villalba Powerful and Emotive, Artist Patrick Onyekwere’s Hyperrealistic Portraits Are Rendered Meticulously in Ballpoint Pen Hyperrealistic Portraits by Artist Arinze Stanley Reflect the Emotions of Black Experiences This article comes from the Internet:Revealing Struggles and Joy, Expressive Portraits Are Superimposed onto Watercolor Foliage

MIMOSA: An Optimistic Collection of Temporary Installations Take Over Philadelphia’s Navy Yard
MIMOSA: An Optimistic Collection of Temporary Instal... more>>

 Art #cross-stitch #installation #language #piñatas #public art #wire MIMOSA: An Optimistic Collection of Temporary Installations Take Over Philadelphia’s Navy Yard September 23, 2020 Grace Ebert Justin Favela’s “Libertad (Freedom).” All images courtesy of Group X, shared with permission An eclectic array of installations recently popped up at the Navy Yard in Philadelphia, transforming the historic neighborhood into a temporary wonderland teeming with quirky characters, large-scale interventions, and optimism. A life-size piñata shaped like a 1984 Thunderbird is parked on 12th Street, cross-stitched roses trail across the brick facade of Building 99, and a typographic message casts shadows on a pavilion in a call for hope. Officially titled Mystery Island and the Marvelous Occurrence of Spontaneous Art, or MIMOSA, the entirely outdoor exhibition includes work from seven artists DAKU (previously), Justin Favela (previously), Kid Hazo with South Fellini, Reed Bmore, Liesbet Bussche, and Raquel Rodrigo (previously). It’s a collaboration between the anonymous collective Group X and the Navy Yard, which was overrun in 2018 by a gargantuan sea monster. MIMOSA‘s six site-specific installations are spread across 1,200 acres.   DAKU’s “Ray of Hope” Activated by sunlight, DAKU’s installation “Rays of Hope” casts shadows in 25 different languages on a brick terrace in Crescent Park. Throughout the day as the light shifts, so do the silhouettes on the ground. “The sun has always been associated as a symbol of energy and so is hope,” DAKU says. Rays of light metaphorically serve as “a symbol of positivity and optimism.” By translating the word “hope” into dozens of languages, the anonymous Indian street artist puts forth a welcoming vision. “When we see a native language, we have a sense of belonging and familiarity with the space. Especially in a foreign land or a place, it makes it more relatable,” DAKU writes. “Languages have been a part of every culture and (have their) own visual aesthetic… Culture is common ground for any language or a form of visual art, and if one comes to think of it, language plays an essential role. It binds the culture in forming into a community.”   Justin Favela’s “Libertad (Freedom)” A nod to his mother’s first purchase after immigrating from Guatemala to the United States in the 1980s, Favela’s paper-fringed car expands on the myth of “The American Dream.” “The promise that if you keep your head down, work really hard and save your money… you, too, can own a home with a two-car garage, get married, have kids, build an empire, and live an abundant and dignified life,” he says. Through his large-scale piñatas, Favela conveys stories like his mother’s, particularly in relation to her longing to return to Central America. “What about the immigrants that come here and realize that they moved to a country that does not want them here? Their stories are also important,” he says. Questions about identity, including his own as a first-generation, queer, Latinx American, and the experiences of people who have immigrated to the U.S. face inform Favela’s artworks. He subverts common narratives by offering a revised way of thinking centered on joy: What are we when we are not viewed as just a labor force? What if we stopped taking pride in suffering and the sacrifices that we had to make? What if we valued joy? Mental health? What if we could take a couple of days of…just because!? What would happen if could just be ourselves? When will we all be free? See the latest from GroupX and follow the installations popping up next in The Navy Yard on Instagram. If you’re in Philadelphia, check out MIMOSA before it closes November 2.   DAKU’s “Ray of Hope” Raquel Rodrigo’s “Florecer (Flourish)” Reed Bmore’s “Bittersweetvine” Liesbet Bussche’s “Rusty Love / Urban Jewelry” Kid Hazo + South Fellini’s “Where the Wild Jawns Are” #cross-stitch #installation #language #piñatas #public art #wire   Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member and support independent arts publishing. Join a community of like-minded readers who are passionate about contemporary art, help support our interview series, gain access to partner discounts, and much more. Join now!   Share this story   Tweet Pin It Also on Colossal Related posts on […]

Interview: Tiffanie Turner Discusses Her Evolving Understanding of Beauty and How the Climate Crisis Impacts Her Realist
Interview: Tiffanie Turner Discusses Her Evolving Un... more>>

 Art Colossal Interview: Tiffanie Turner Discusses Her Evolving Understanding of Beauty and How the Climate Crisis Impacts Her Realistic Florals March 23, 2020 Grace Ebert Photo by Shaun Roberts, courtesy of Eleanor Harwood Gallery San Francisco-based artist Tiffanie Turner is known for creating large-scale paper flowers that embody themes of beauty and aging. In the latest interview for Colossal Members, Turner spoke with our managing editor, Grace Ebert, about her relationship to botany, how she manages her time, and the role teaching plays in her work.   Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member and support independent arts publishing. Join a community of like-minded readers who are passionate about contemporary art, apply for our annual grant, and get exclusive access to interviews, partner discounts, and event tickets.   Share this story   Tweet Pin It Also on Colossal Related posts on Colossal about Dramatic Decaying Flowers in Tiffanie Turner’s Solo Show “What Befell Us” Challenge Notions of Beauty and Perfection Tiffanie Turner’s Debut Book Shows How To Create Her Masterful Paper Flowers Giant Paper Flowers by Tiffanie Turner Interview: Susanna Bauer Examines the Tension Between Strength and Fragility in Her Stitched Leaves New Giant Paper Flower Sculptures by Tiffanie Turner This article comes from the Internet:Interview: Tiffanie Turner Discusses Her Evolving Understanding of Beauty and How the Climate Crisis Impacts Her Realistic Florals

Japanese Chef Has Filled Notebooks with Delectable Illustrations of All of His Meals for 32 Years
Japanese Chef Has Filled Notebooks with Delectable I... more>>

 Art Food Illustration #notebooks #painting Japanese Chef Has Filled Notebooks with Delectable Illustrations of All of His Meals for 32 Years March 21, 2020 Grace Ebert All images ©  Kushino Terrace, shared with permission Some meals leave an impression—you might remember the cherry pie your grandma always made or a multi-course dinner consisting of toast and caviar, a mound of shaved truffle topping pasta, and wagyu tartare. Rather than solely rely on his memory to envision the fare he’s enjoyed, though, Japanese chef Itsuo Kobayashi has been painting and describing in detail the dishes he’s eaten for the past 32 years in a series of notebooks and standalone works. While an interesting look at Kobayashi’s nourishment, the detailed projects are also a growing collection of outsider art. N. Kushino, who runs Kushino Terrace gallery in Fukuyama, Japan, and represents Kobayashi, tells Colossal that the artist begins by writing detailed passages of what he eats before going back to create his appetizing illustrations. What stands out is that all of these drawings feature an overhead perspective so that all of the ingredients of the food Kobayashi depicts can be seen. Furthermore, in the blank spaces in his compositions, the artist writes the names and prices of, and his opinions about the food and the ingredients he portrays. He adds positive descriptive words about his subjects, such as “delicious,” so that he may provoke good memories when he later looks at the drawings. For many years, Kobayashi cooked at a soba restaurant and provided meals for schools until he was diagnosed with alcoholic neuritis, a debilitating condition that reduced his mobility. Now, the artist mostly works from home, ordering take-out often and continuing to detail his meals at length. Since he started the creative project at age 18, Kobayashi has produced more than 1,000 illustrations. “For him, painting and living have the same meaning. The disease (makes it) more and more difficult to walk, but he does not stop painting,” Kushino says. Most recently, Kobayashi has begun shaping pop-ups in his works featuring bowls of tempura seafood and piles of noodles. Shared at the Outsider Art Fair in New York earlier this year, Kobayashi’s pieces sold for up to $3,000. To see a project in the same vein, check out James Deeds Jr.’s Ectlectric Pencil. (via ArtNet)   Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member and support independent arts publishing. Join a community of like-minded readers who are passionate about contemporary art, apply for our annual grant, and get exclusive access to interviews, partner discounts, and event tickets.   Share this story   Tweet Pin It Also on Colossal Related posts on Colossal about notebooks painting Japanese Paper Notebooks Featuring Vintage Science Illustrations Merged with Hand-embroidery Ectlectrc Pencil: Lost Collection of Pencil Drawings Reveals Trials of Patient at Missouri State Hospital No. 3 Portraits of Venezuelan Families Reframe the Harrowing Journey of Immigrants Food Artist Uses Wax to Make Incredibly Realistic Food Samples in Japan Clever Projected Animations of a Tiny Chef Cooking Meals Atop Actual Table Settings This article comes from the Internet:Japanese Chef Has Filled Notebooks with Delectable Illustrations of All of His Meals for 32 Years

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